The Need

In Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, our ocean resources are ecologically and economically linked. What happens in one part of our ocean can adversely impact or mutually benefit us all.  With competing demands on our ocean at an all-time high, finding ways to engage all stakeholders in coastal and marine planning has never been more important.  Comprehensive regional ocean planning is key to supporting healthy marine ecosystems and the economies of our coastal communities.

The Solution

Through the development of a robust ocean data and information management system that includes a wide range of environmental, socioeconomic and regulatory data, the Caribbean Regional Ocean Partnership (CROP) is providing the building blocks for multi-use, regional-scale marine planning. 

Frequent and continuous stakeholder and public participation is necessary to provide an informed and inclusive foundation for Marine Spatial Planning (MSP). Our goal is to share information about what MSP is or could be, to hear stakeholder views and concerns and to foster better understanding between those who depend on ocean resources for their livelihood and ocean conservation advocates. 

The CROP establishes mechanisms to improve regional collaboration on ocean management in order to reduce user conflicts, improve cohesive regional planning, and support healthy communities and ecosystems for present and future generations.

The CROP’s state-of-the-art, Marine Planner, engages all stakeholders in ocean planning — putting all of the essential data and state-of-the-art mapping and visualization technology into the hands of the agencies, industry, and community leaders engaged in ocean planning. Users are able to visualize and analyze ocean resources and human use information such as fishing grounds, recreational areas, shipping lanes, habitat areas, and energy sites, among others.

The Team

The Caribbean Regional Ocean Partnership (CROP) is an alliance between the Governors of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands to improve regional collaboration on ocean management in order to reduce user conflicts, improve cohesive regional planning, and support healthy communities and ecosystems for present and future generations.

The CROP will address cumulative effects from anthropogenic activities to ensure the protection, integrity, maintenance, resilience, and restoration of ocean and coastal Caribbean ecosystems, while promoting multiple uses. We are committed to providing the tools and resources necessary for collaborative, scientifically-informed and adaptive approach to ocean management.

The CROP team is comprised of appointed members from Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Island Governors offices, as well as Departments of Natural Resources, and The Nature Conservancy. Funding for the CROP is provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Regional Ocean Partnership funding program. 

The CROP will seek effective engagement of stakeholders in the CMSP through an open and transparent process and with the establishment of a Science and Technical Advisory Group (STAG) and Stakeholder Advisory Group (SAG).

LEARN MORE


Data in the Marine Planner is divided into six key ocean planning themes. Click through above photos for each theme and see what’s available.

With competing demands on our oceans at an all-time high, finding ways to engage all stakeholders in coastal and marine planning has never been more important. With the Portal, CROP has created a robust ocean data and information management system that includes a wide range of human use, environmental, socioeconomic and regulatory data that will provide the building blocks for multi-use, regional-scale ocean planning. The Portal enables state, federal and local users to visualize and analyze ocean resources and ocean use information across a wide variety of sectors. Find out more about each sector below. All ocean stakeholders need to take part in identifying our region’s ocean planning priorities. Whether through reviewing existing information or contributing new data to fill critical gaps, your participation in the CROP planning process will help set the stage for future management decisions that balance diverse goals and provide lasting benefits for our region.

What is the Data Catalog

The Data Catalog gathers available data and recruits new data about ocean resources and human use information such as fishing grounds, recreational areas, shipping lanes, habitat areas, and energy sites. Data falls into one of seven themes. You can explore the data available under each theme, and you can also see key new data needs under Data Priorities.

To receive any of the data in this catalog, please email cortiz@drna.pr.gov or vimarrero@drna.pr.gov (for Puerto Rico) and pedro.nieves@dpnr.vi.gov (for US Virgin Islands), with the following basic information: your name, your organization/agency/institution, and your intended use of the data. 

*These environmental data and related items of information have not been formally disseminated by NOAA and do not represent and should not be construed to represent any agency determination, view, or policy.

What are the Data Priorities

CROP is actively seeking new data in order to comprehensively inform the regional ocean planning process. The list highlights the Portal’s top priorities at the moment. Please contact us if you have existing data we could use or would like to partner with CROP in developing one or more of the data sets mentioned. And check back regularly for new requests.

  • ADMINISTRATIVE & REGULATORY
  • COASTAL CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE
  • MARINE LIFE
  • MARITIME
  • OCEANOGRAPHIC INFORMATION
  • TOURISM & RECREATION

Numerous management boundaries in the Caribbean are compiled here to provide administrative and regulatory contexts to help facilitate well-informed ocean planning decisions.

Boundaries are provided courtesy of the responsible agencies and these parties should be consulted to ensure that map layers represented here are current and correctly interpreted. The boundaries presented here should not be considered to be legally binding.

Critical infrastructure such as ports, airports, roads, power plants, waste water treatment plants and industrial parks are constructed within 1 Km of the coast. Deforestation in the upper areas of watersheds, increasing urbanization, poorly constructed or maintained infrastructure and impervious surfaces are threatening U.S. Caribbean Island coastal ecosystems. 

Coastal managers and decision-makers need to evaluate the implications of land-use changes, coastal development pressures, land-based sources of pollution and increased resource use. A balance between anthropogenic needs and environmental health is necessary for the preservation of coastal spaces and resources, while assuring economic and socio-cultural necessities. 

The varied habitats and abundant resources of the U.S. Caribbean Islands supports a highly diverse group of coastal and marine wildlife that depend on both the oceanic and terrestrial ecosystems of the region throughout the year. 

CROP has compiled habitat data, as well as known distributions and abundances of many of the key fish, mammal, bird, and reptile species found in the Caribbean region. In the future, additional data will be added to round out the collection and to allow regional planners to make management and policy decisions that are compatible with and enhance the conservation of these animals and their ecosystem.


Marine transportation is an essential component of the global economy. Approximately 90-95 percent of the world trade is conducted by ships. Shipment of crude oil, petroleum products and gas, food and other materials are transported through different maritime routes. The U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) estimates that approximately 3,000 vessels arrive to Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands annually. 

Management of navigation waters requires a safe, efficient, and navigable waterway system to support domestic commerce, international trade, and military requirements. Coastal managers and relevant stakeholders need to identify navigational challenges facing the marine transportation system as well as providing the services that promote a safe and efficient navigation system. 


Many research and education activities are dedicated to the advancement of oceanographic sciences and the study of the complex problems within the coastal zones of the U.S. Caribbean Islands. It is important to translate and interpret this science for the public and to assist in the development of professional ocean research programs. 

The datasets in the Oceanographic theme provide baseline information on the physical characteristics of the surrounding ocean.  These data layers are provided by the Caribbean Coastal Ocean Observing System (CariCOOS), NOAA, and the U.S. Coast Guard.

Tourism is one of the largest industries in the world and in most of the cases, tourism is environmentally dependent. In 2011 nearly 4.2 million tourists visited U.S. Caribbean Islands spending a total of $3,142,800,000, which represents 7 percent of the islands' gross national production (Economic Report to the Governor, 2011). 

Most visitors are attracted to the island’s coastal spaces and resources. Recreation activities such as fishing, swimming, diving, surfing, wind-surfing, jet skiing and snorkeling have increased in volume and number during the last decade and coastal areas are among the most visited by tourists in Puerto Rico. This trend has triggered an increase in construction of tourism facilities and urban development along coastal zones. 

During recent decades there has been more demand for space in coastal lands to build second homes and tourism related facilities. However, inadequately planned tourism and urban construction may impact local coastal communities. Rapid tourism development may contribute to contamination and degradation of marine environments through inadequate used water waste systems and sedimentation, loss of habitats and lack of environmental awareness by visitors. To accomplish sustainable tourism a balanced should be achieved between coastal resource use and a healthy environment. 

One of the major challenges in coastal tourism management is to develop coastal tourism strategies that will not affect the quality of the natural resources. It is important to minimize tourism-induced problems and secure the sustainability of the tourism industry as well as the coastal resources. Coastal tourism management needs to include participation and integration of various stakeholders including community and local political leadership to ensure a productive consensus. 


Preview Data Catalogs

12NM Territorial Sea

This layer is the 12nm territorial sea.

200NM EZ and Maritime Boundaries

This layer contains the US 200nm EEZ as well as adjacent international maritime boundaries, where the US EEZ would otherwise overlap another coastal State.

24NM Contiguous Zone

This layer is the 24nm contiguous zone.

MPA Inventory

The MPA Inventory is a comprehensive catalog that provides detailed information for existing marine protected areas in the United States. The inventory provides geospatial boundary information (in polygon format) and classification attributes that seek to define the conservation objectives, protection level, governance and related management criteria for all sites in the database. The comprehensive inventory of federal, state and territorial MPA sites provides governments and stakeholders with access to information to make better decisions about the current and future use of place-based conservation. The information also will be used to inform the development of the national system of marine protected areas as required by Executive Order 13158.

MPA Inventory - nonNMFS

The MPA Inventory is a comprehensive catalog that provides detailed information for existing marine protected areas in the United States. The inventory provides geospatial boundary information (in polygon format) and classification attributes that seek to define the conservation objectives, protection level, governance and related management criteria for all sites in the database. The comprehensive inventory of federal, state and territorial MPA sites provides governments and stakeholders with access to information to make better decisions about the current and future use of place-based conservation. The information also will be used to inform the development of the national system of marine protected areas as required by Executive Order 13158.

PR 9 Nautical Mile Boundary

Jurisdictional boundary of the Puerto Rico Coastal Zone Management Program.

PR Conservation Priority Areas

Conservation priority areas are places with high ecological value, such as the habitat of endangered species, and have priority when implementing conservation projects and designating new protected areas.

PR DRNA Protected Areas with Uses and Facilities

This layer presents the Natural Protected Areas under the stewardship of the Puerto Rico DNR (DRNA) with the uses and facilities available. The layer includes information from the natural area and the use and facilities availability attributes that include: rivers, lakes, lighthouses, wetlands, reefs, bioluminescence, beaches, caves, water resources, surfing, hunting, trails, ramps, parking, gazebos, restrooms, observations, barbecue areas, snorkeling, and fishing areas.

PR Protected Area Concessions

This layer contains the locations of concessions granted by the Department of Natural Resources (DRNA) on protected areas around the Island of Puerto Rico. For each location the activity authorized, permit number, terms of authorization among other information is provided.

PR Protected Areas

Delimitation and Classification of Protected Natural Areas in Puerto Rico by legislation and/or management agreements.

PR Special Planning Areas

Special planning areas are broader areas with important coastal resources subject to conflicts due to diverse uses (current or potential), which require detailed or special planning and zoning codes.

Planning Grid

Planning grid for the Wind Energy Planning Tool of the CROP Data Portal. Cell size for this grid is 750m x 750m. The attribute table holds all the data information that will be used to create the filters of the tool. For field definitions see the "Fields" section of this metadata.

USVI 3 nautical mile boundary

Jurisdictional boundary of the USVI Coastal Zone Management Program.

USVI Anchorage Areas

This anchorages file represents the areas where representatives from charter yacht and dive companies in St. Thomas and St. John anchor their vessels. The file displays the locations of known anchorage areas and includes the following attributes: area name, boat capacity, and anchorage type.

USVI Areas of Particular Concern

The Virgin Islands Coastal Zone Management Act of 1978 declared that certain areas of the USVI's coastal zone are of special significance, and called for an inventory and designation of areas of particular concern (APCs) within the coastal zone. Based on technical review by government staff and public review and input, 18 land and water areas were designated as APCs. The CZM Division of DPNR is responsible for the management of these 18 areas. Upon the development and approval of management plans and rules and regulations for these areas, DPNR's Division of Environmental Enforcement will be responsible for enforcement.

USVI Cruise Turning Basin

This file represents the area used by large ships for turning around. This file was created through participatory mapping. The file shows just the extent with no attributes.

USVI Protected Areas

The protected area shapefile was compiled by the Nature Conservancy (TNC) with substantial submissions and assistance from 21 different governments with sometimes multiple representatives within a government in the insular Caribbean. The data represents a core dataset in conservation for the region. The Nature Conservancy works to keep this file as up to date as possible and uses it heavily in representing what is protected across the insular Caribbean. The protected areas in this file are locations which receive some sort of protection or designated as a particular managed area under the law related to natural, ecological and/or cultural values. Overlap does occur in this dataset.

USVI Tier I Lands

The Virgin Islands CZM Act of 1978 defined the coastal zone of the Virgin Islands as those lands that have a direct and significant impact on the coastal waters. The coastal zone, as delineated by a series of maps registered with the Lt. Governor's Office, is under the management and planning authority given to the Division of Coastal Zone Management. CZM regulates all development within in first tier of the Virgin Islands coastal zone. The first tier comprises of a relatively narrow strip along the coast, excluding all federal land, and all off-shore islands and cays.

USVI Tier II Lands

Oversight of the land development process in the USVI has been divided into two coastal geographic tiers. Tier I is comprised of a relatively narrow strip long the coast, excluding all federal land, and all off-shore islands and cays and is within the jurisdiction of the Coastal Zone Management Program. Remaining areas are Tier II and under the jurisdiction of the Division of Environmental Protection. For St. Thomas, Tier II lands are those not categorized as Tier I and that lay outside of the National Park.

PR Development and Industrial Parks

This dataset was downloaded from the gis.pr.gov website in November of 2013. No metadata was available on the development of this data layer.

PR Electrical Plants

This dataset was downloaded from the gis.pr.gov website in November of 2013. No metadata was available on the development of this data layer.

PR Electrical Substation

This dataset was downloaded from the gis.pr.gov website in November of 2013. No metadata was available on the development of this data layer.

PR Hospitals and Diagnostic Treatment Centers

This file includes different categories of health care locations such as: CDT - Center for Diagnosis and Treatment, Private Ambulances Centers, Medical Emergency State, Municipal Emergency Medical, Hospital, and IPA (Independent Practice Association)

PR Hotels

Location of Tourism Company Endorsed Lodgings as of August 2012.

PR Landfills

The layer has information about the Landfill Sites in PR. They depict location of the landfill sites. This dataset was obtained from the Puerto Rico Planning Board for the CROP in 2012.

PR Marinas

The layer has information about the Marinas sites in PR. They depict location of the marinas sites. This dataset was obtained from the Puerto Rico Planning Board for the CROP in 2012.

PR Ports

The layer has information about the location of major ports and docks in PR. Additional information attributed includes ID's, site location and port name. This dataset was obtained from the Puerto Rico Planning Board for the CROP in 2012.

PR Potable Water Filtration

The layer has information about the Potable Water Filtration and Treatment Plants in PR. They depict location of the potable water filtration and treatment plants. Additional information attributed includes site location, name, ID's, operational information and site specific information for each element.

PR Roads

The TIGER/Line shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census Bureau's Master Address File / Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing (MAF/TIGER) Database (MTDB). The MTDB represents a seamless national file with no overlaps or gaps between parts, however, each TIGER/Line shapefile is designed to stand alone as an independent data set, or they can be combined to cover the entire nation. This layer includes all features within the MTDB Super Class "Road/Path Features" distinguished where the MAF/TIGER Feature Classification Code (MTFCC) for the feature in MTDB that begins with "S". This includes all primary, secondary, local neighborhood, and rural roads, city streets, vehicular trails (4wd), ramps, service drives, alleys, parking lot roads, private roads for service vehicles (logging, oil fields, ranches, etc.), bike paths or trails, bridle/horse paths, walkways/pedestrian trails, and stairways.

PR Sewage Treatment Plants

The layer has information about the Waste Water and SewageTreatment Plants in PR. They depict location of the waste water and sewage treatment plants. Additional information attributed includes site location, name, ID's, operational information and site specific information for each element.

PR USVI Airports

This point feature class represents airports of Puerto Rico and USVI.

USVI Boat Ramp

Boatramp points from the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for the Virgin Islands completed in 2000. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by their sensitivity to spilled oil.

USVI Commercial Ports

This file includes only the Name of the ports as additional attribute information.

USVI Marinas

This file is a combination of 2 separate files. The first represents the main marinas around St. Thomas and St. John. This file was created through participatory mapping. Representatives from the boating, diving, and fishing industries all met together and through a series of map exercises, mapped out the extent of these areas which were then hand digitized from aerial imagery. The second file was labeled as created from 2008 data; however there was not associated metadata with the file. This dataset gives the names and fuel availability found in the attribute table.

USVI Moorings

This moorings file represents the areas where recreational watercraft can be secured. Some of these areas are the same polygons as in the dive site file for St. Thomas and St. John. For St. Croix, only data within the East End Marine Park were collected. These points were buffered (50m) to combine with the STT and STJ data.

USVI Roads

The TIGER/Line shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census Bureau's Master Address File / Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing (MAF/TIGER) Database (MTDB). The MTDB represents a seamless national file with no overlaps or gaps between parts, however, each TIGER/Line shapefile is designed to stand alone as an independent data set, or they can be combined to cover the entire nation. This layer includes all features within the MTDB Super Class "Road/Path Features" distinguished where the MAF/TIGER Feature Classification Code (MTFCC) for the feature in MTDB that begins with "S". This includes all primary, secondary, local neighborhood, and rural roads, city streets, vehicular trails (4wd), ramps, service drives, alleys, parking lot roads, private roads for service vehicles (logging, oil fields, ranches, etc.), bike paths or trails, bridle/horse paths, walkways/pedestrian trails, and stairways.

Artificial Reefs

An artificial reef is a human-made underwater structure, typically built to promote marine life in areas with a generally featureless bottom, control erosion, block ship passage, or improve surfing. Many reefs are built using objects that were built for other purposes, for example by sinking oil rigs (through the Rigs-to-Reefs program), scuttling ships, or by deploying rubble or construction debris. Other artificial reefs are purpose built (e.g. the reef balls) from PVC or concrete. Shipwrecks may become artificial reefs when preserved on the sea floor. Regardless of construction method, artificial reefs generally provide hard surfaces where algae and invertebrates such as barnacles, corals, and oysters attach; the accumulation of attached marine life in turn provides intricate structure and food for assemblages of fish. This is NOT a complete collection of artificial reefs on the seafloor, nor are the locations to be considered exact. The presence and location of the artificial reefs have been derived from multiple state websites. These data are intended for coastal and ocean planning.

PR Mangroves

USGS data representing mangroves at 1:24k in Puerto Rico.

PR Marine Species Surveys

The studies were conducted to observe manatee and sea turtle distribution in certain areas of Puerto Rico. Data was collected by staff from the DRNA of Puerto Rico, by the Caribbean Stranding Network, which includes aerial surveys and boat surveys, and data on manatee sightings during aerial surveys were conducted by US Fish and Wildlife Service from 1983 to 2002.

PR USVI Coral and Hardbottom

This project is a cooperative effort between NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), U.S. Geological Survey, National Park Service, and the National Geophysical Data Center, to produce benthic habitat maps and georeferenced imagery for Puerto Rico. This project was conducted in support of the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force.

PR USVI Submerged Vegetation

This project is a cooperative effort between NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), U.S. Geological Survey, National Park Service, and the National Geophysical Data Center, to produce benthic habitat maps and georeferenced imagery for Puerto Rico. This project was conducted in support of the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force.

USVI Lionfish

This is a subset of a USGS product on nonindigenous aquatic species for lion fish on population status/spatial accuracy for April 2015. The full dataset can be viewed through http://nas2.er.usgs.gov/viewer/omap.aspx?SpeciesID=963. There is also a USVI dataset. http://www.corevi.org/

USVI Mangroves

This dataset shows the locations of mangroves throughout the US Virgin Islands. 4 different types of mangroves are represented in the attribute table: fringing mangrove, mangrove forest, mangrove shrubland, and mangrove woodland. This dataset was a part of the TNC Caribbean spatial database.

USVI STXEEMP Restoration

Restoration represents all the areas where restoration is currently and could potentially take place within the East End Marine Park of St. Croix, USVI. The file shows mainly the extents with a few important attributes such as habitat type and whether the area exists as restoration or is just a potential site for future restoration.

Aids to Navigation

Structures intended to assist a navigator to determine position or safe course, or to warn of dangers or obstructions to navigation. This dataset includes lights, signals, buoys, day beacons, and other aids to navigation. These data are not to be used for navigation.

COLREGs Demarcation Lines

U.S. collision regulation boundaries are lines of demarcation delineating those waters upon which mariners shall comply with the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea, 1972 (72 COLREGS) and those waters upon which mariners shall comply with the Inland Navigation Rules. The waters inland of these lines are subject to the Inland Navigation Rules Act of 1980. The waters outside these lines are subject to the International Navigation Rules of the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea, 1972 (COLREGS). The Coast Guard has the legal authority to effect regulatory changes to COLREGS. Creation of features was interpreted from descriptions published in the Code of Federal Regulations Title 33, Part 80.

Danger Zones and Restricted Areas

The areas described in subpart A (33 U.S.C. 100) are designated as special anchorage areas. Vessels of less than 20 meters are not required to exhibit anchor lights or shapes required by rule 30 of the Inland Navigation Rules (33 U.S.C. 2030). The areas described in subpart B are designated as anchorage grounds. Please Note: Some areas depicted are deemed "Anchorage Prohibited" or "Anchor at Your Own Risk". Please refer to the appropriate Nautical Chart or the CFR for more detailed information.

High Frequency Radar Locations

This dataset show the point locations of High Frequency (HF) radar systems across the US. HF radars measure the speed and direction of ocean surface currents in near real time. These radars can measure currents over a large region of the coastal ocean, from a few kilometers offshore up to 200 km, and can operate under any weather conditions. They are located near the water’s edge, and need not be situated atop a high point of land. Dozens of institutions own and operate HF radars within the United States, and many are coordinated through the US Integrated Ocean Observing System. Ocean surface current data from these radars are shared on national servers by the National Data Buoy Center and Scripps Institution of Oceanography. If specific information regarding a local radar system is needed, please contact Dr. Jack Harlan, Project Manager for the HF Radar Ocean Remote Sensing, US IOOS Program Office.

High Frequency Radar Radial Ranges

Pilot Boarding Areas

Pilot boarding areas are locations at sea where pilots familiar with local waters board incoming vessels to navigate their passage to a destination port. Pilotage is compulsory for foreign vessels and U.S. vessels under register in foreign trade with specific draft characteristics. Pilot boarding areas are represented by a 0.5 nautical mile radius around a coordinate point unless the Coast Pilot specifically designates a different radius or boarding area boundary. This dataset does not contain information regarding the hazards and considerations necessary to approach each port.

Puerto Rico Sediment Discharge Locations

Puerto Rico Watersheds

Submarine Cables

These data depict the occurrence of submarine cables in and around U.S. navigable waters. The purpose of this data product is to support coastal planning at the regional and national scale. Source geometry and attributes were derived from 2010 NOAA Electronic Navigational Charts (ENCs) and 2009 NOAA Raster Navigational Charts (RNCs) and recently updated in 2013 referencing the RNCs. Polyline features explicitly defined as cables were compiled from the original sources, exclusive of those features noted as 'cable areas'. The scale of the source material was highly variable and discontinuities between multiple sources were resolved with least possible spatial adjustments. The original S-57 data model was modified for readability and performance.

USVI Sediment Discharge Locations

Unexploded Ordnances

These data represent the location of Danger Zones and Restricted Areas within coastal and marine waters, as outlined by the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) and the Raster Navigational Charts (RNC). The CFR defines a Danger Zone as, "A defined water area (or areas) used for target practice, bombing, rocket firing or other especially hazardous operations, normally for the armed forces. The danger zones may be closed to the public on a full-time or intermittent basis, as stated in the regulations." The CFR defines a Restricted Area as, "A defined water area for the purpose of prohibiting or limiting public access to the area. Restricted areas generally provide security for Government property and/or protection to the public from the risks of damage or injury arising from the Government's use of that area." Authoritative information relating to these data may be found in Title 33, Chapter II of the CFR (Part 334).

Vessel Groundings

Vessel grounding reports (2009 - 2016). This dataset is the product of a collaborative effort between NOAA, US Coast Guard, PR Department of Natural Resources (DRNA) and USVI Department of Planning and Natural Resources (DPNR). Last updated on February 13th, 2016.

Weather Radar Impact Zones

Weather Radar Stations (Federal)

These data represent Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) stations within the US. The NEXRAD radar stations are maintained and operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The TDWR radar stations are maintained and operated by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Both radar's are pulsed Doppler types that measure reflectivity out to 460km, and radial velocity and spectrum width out to 300km (NEXRAD) and 90km (TDWR). Both radars automatically scan the atmosphere from the surface to 70,000ft using a rotating parabolic antenna.

Bathymetric Contours

Coastal bathymetric depth, measured in meters at depth values of: -10, -20, -30, -40, -50, -60, -70, -80, -90, -100, -150 -200, -400, -600

National Seafloor Sediment (usSEABED)

The usSEABED database contains data for the entire U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone and is an ongoing task of the Marine Aggregates Resources and Processes and National Benthic Habitats Studies (Pacific) projects, USGS Coastal and Marine Geology teams in Santa Cruz, CA, Woods Hole, MA, and St. Petersburg, FL, and the University of Colorado. This data layer is a point coverage of known sediment samplings, inspections and probings from the usSEABED data collection and integrated using the software system dbSEABED. This data layer represents the extracted (EXT) output of the dbSEABED mining software. The EXT data is usually based on instrumental analyses (probe or laboratory) but may apply to just a subsample of the sediment (eg. no large shells).

Ocean Wave Resource Potential

Data depicts mean wave power density within U.S. waters. Estimates represent naturally available U.S. wave energy, derived from measurements observed during a 51-month study period. Measurements were taken from 42,000 grid points out to a distance of 50 nautical miles from shore. Values represent the average instantaneous power generated by a meter length of wave crest per grid point. In accordance with accepted global practice, wave power density is measured in kilowatts per meter (kW/m) of wave crest aggregated across a unit diameter circle. These data were classified using quantiles.

Offshore Wind Technology Depth Zones

Coastal bathymetric depth, measured in meters at depth values of: -30, -60, -900 Shallow Zone (0-30m): Technology has been demonstrated on a commercial scale at these depths. Foundation types include monopile, gravity base and suction buckets designs. Transition Zone (30-60m): Technology has not been demonstrated on a commercial scale at these depths but several small scale projects have been successfully installed and commissioned at these depths  Foundation types include tripod, jacket and tripile designs. Deepwater Zone (60 - 900m): Technology has not been demonstrated on a commercial scale at these depths but several pilot projects have been successfully demonstrated.  Foundation types include spar, semi-submersible and tension leg platform designs.

PR Cat.1 Hurricane Flood with Sea Level 0.5m

PR Cat.1 Hurricane Flood with Sea Level 1m

PR Cat.1 Hurricane Flood: Current Sea Level

PR Cat.2 Hurricane Flood with Sea Level 0.5m

PR Cat.2 Hurricane Flood with Sea Level 1m

PR Cat.2 Hurricane Flood: Current Sea Level

PR Cat.3 Hurricane Flood with Sea Level 0.5m

PR Cat.3 Hurricane Flood with Sea Level 1m

PR Cat.3 Hurricane Flood: Current Sea Level

PR Cat.4 Hurricane Flood with Sea Level 0.5m

PR Cat.4 Hurricane Flood with Sea Level 1m

PR Cat.4 Hurricane Flood: Current Sea Level

PR Cat.5 Hurricane Flood with Sea Level 0.5m

PR Cat.5 Hurricane Flood with Sea Level 1m

PR Cat.5 Hurricane Flood: Current Sea Level

PR Sea Level Rise (0.5 m)

These data were created as part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coastal Services Center's efforts to create an online mapping viewer depicting potential sea level rise and its associated impacts on the nation's coastal areas. The purpose of the mapping viewer is to provide coastal managers and scientists with a preliminary look at sea level rise (slr) and coastal flooding impacts. The viewer is a screening-level tool that uses nationally consistent data sets and analyses.Data and maps provided can be used at several scales to help gauge trends and prioritize actions for different scenarios. The process uses two source datasets to derive the final inundation rasters and polygons and accompanying low-lying polygons for each iteration of sea level rise: the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the area and a tidal surface model that represents spatial tidal variability. The tidal model is created using the NOAA National Geodetic Survey's VDATUM datum transformation software (http://vdatum.noaa.gov) in conjunction with spatial interpolation/extrapolation methods and represents the MHHW tidal datum in orthometric values (North American Vertical Datum of 1988). The model used to produce these data does not account for erosion, subsidence, or any future changes in an area's hydrodynamics. It is simply a method to derive data in order to visualize the potential scale, not exact location, of inundation from sea level rise.

PR Sea Level Rise (1 m)

These data were created as part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coastal Services Center's efforts to create an online mapping viewer depicting potential sea level rise and its associated impacts on the nation's coastal areas. The purpose of the mapping viewer is to provide coastal managers and scientists with a preliminary look at sea level rise (slr) and coastal flooding impacts. The viewer is a screening-level tool that uses nationally consistent data sets and analyses.Data and maps provided can be used at several scales to help gauge trends and prioritize actions for different scenarios. The process used to produce the data can be described as a modified bathtub approach that attempts to account for both local/regional tidal variability as well as hydrological connectivity. The process uses two source datasets to derive the final inundation rasters and polygons and accompanying low-lying polygons for each iteration of sea level rise: the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the area and a tidal surface model that represents spatial tidal variability. The tidal model is created using the NOAA National Geodetic Survey's VDATUM datum transformation software () in conjunction with spatial interpolation/extrapolation methods and represents the MHHW tidal datum in orthometric values (North American Vertical Datum of 1988). The model used to produce these data does not account for erosion, subsidence, or any future changes in an area's hydrodynamics. It is simply a method to derive data in order to visualize the potential scale, not exact location, of inundation from sea level rise.

PR USVI Coastline

This dataset is derived from NOAA's study, the Benthic Habitats of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The Benthic Habitats data is the result of a cooperative effort between NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), U.S. Geological Survey, National Park Service, and the National Geophysical Data Center, to produce benthic habitat maps and georeferenced imagery for Puerto Rico. This project was conducted in support of the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force.

USVI Fishers Catch Biogrid -St. Thomas and St. John

The Fishers Biogrid was designed to assist local fishermen with their catch report that's due to the local Division of Fish and Wildlife by indicating where the different species of fish were caught.

PR Beach Monitoring Stations

Information about the location, classification, and status of each station.

PR Cabo Rojo Boat Races

This layer identifies areas within the Cabo Rojo coral priority area that represent where outboard engine boats held racing events.

PR Cabo Rojo Chinchorro Fishing

This layer identifies areas within the Cabo Rojo coral priority area where gill net fishing occurs.

PR Cabo Rojo Dive Fishing

This layer identifies areas within the Cabo Rojo coral priority area that represent where commercial dive fishing takes place (including lobster and conch fishing).

PR Cabo Rojo Human Use Activities

The purpose of this layer is to depict several activities and facilities locations within the southwest Puerto Rico Area (Cabo Rojo). Locations in this layer have been merged transformed from a polygon layer to point layer data for better visualization. The layer original source is referenced in the Data_Source attribute. Additional attributes include: Activities, Facilities, and Locations. Some activities included are: Boat Launch Area, Boat Rafting, Buoy Markers, Freighters Anchorage Area, Kite Surfing, New Buoys, Paddleboards, Scuba, Snorkeling.

PR Cabo Rojo Human Use Activities (Line)

The purpose of this layer is to depict several routes for maritime activities within the southwest Puerto Rico Area (Cabo Rojo). Locations in this layer have been merged transformed from a polygon layer to line layer data for better visualization. The layer original source is referenced in the Data_Source attribute. Additional attributes include: Activities, Facilities, and Locations. Some activities included are: Jet Ski, Carrera de Veleros, Kayak Routes, and Maritime Transit Routes.

PR Cabo Rojo Human Use Facilities

The purpose of this layer is to depict several activities and facilities locations within the southwest Puerto Rico Area (Cabo Rojo). Locations in this layer have been merged transformed from a polygon layer to point layer data for better visualization. The layer original source is referenced in the Data_Source attribute. Additional attributes include: Activities, Facilities, and Locations. Some activities included are: Boat Launch Area, Boat Rafting, Buoy Markers, Freighters Anchorage Area, Kite Surfing, New Buoys, Paddleboards, Scuba, Snorkeling.

PR Cabo Rojo Line Fishing

This layer identifies areas within the Cabo Rojo coral priority area where line fishing occurs (including yellowtail snapper and mutton snapper or sama).

PR Cabo Rojo Ray Fishing

This layer identifies the area within the Cabo Rojo coral priority area where ray-fish fishing takes place.

PR Cabo Rojo Recreational Diving

This layer identifies areas within the Cabo Rojo coral priority area that represent recreational diving sites.

PR Cabo Rojo Shark Fishing

This layer identifies areas within the Cabo Rojo coral priority area where shark fishing takes place.

PR Cabo Rojo Trap Fishing

This layer identifies areas within the Cabo Rojo coral priority area where trap/box fishing occurs (including chapin).

PR Dive Sites

Diving (SCUBA) sites in Puerto Rico.

PR Education Areas

This layer contains the locations of educational sites, activity sites and areas of interest as identified by members of paralanaturaleza.org.

PR Education Zones

This layer contains the locations of educational sites and points of interest as identified by members of paralanaturaleza.org.

PR Mooring Buoys

Inventory mooring buoys installed and maintained by the Department of Natural and Environmental Resources. Updated: February 16, 2016.

PR Public Beaches

Zoning for Public beaches (bathing areas). According to the Planning Regulation no. 4, Section 61, effective September 16, 1992. Pursuant to the provisions of Act. 75 of June 24, 1975 and Law No. 48 of June 27, 1986.

PR Surfing

This layer contains the locations of surfing sites.

PR Swimming Areas

This layer represents the locations of access to swimming areas on the beaches of Puerto Rico.

USVI Boating - Commercial

This commercial boating file represents the major routes operating out of the USVI for ferries and commercial fishing. The file shows intra- and inter-island routes.

USVI Boating - Recreational

This file is a combination of data from St. John and St. Thomas (motorboats and day sailing activities: routes taken by different charter sailing companies and popular destination areas for day sailing) and St. Croix (general boating, charter boating, and sport fishing). The routes were buffered to create polygons that could be combined with the popular area polygons to create one file. The file displays the locations of known routes and includes the following attributes: area name, usage (high/low), and season of dominant use; though many of the polygons have no attribute information.

USVI Divesites

This file represents the areas around USVI that are often used for recreational and charter diving. Some dive sites include moorings and therefore overlap with parts of the mooring areas layer, while others are non-mooring areas. This file was created through participatory mapping. Representatives from the boating, diving, and fishing industries all met together and through a series of map exercises, mapped out the extent of these dive sites. The file shows mainly the extents with a few important attributes such as name, use, and site features.

USVI Personal Watercraft Motorized

Motoized personal watercraft represents the extents and routes of watercraft use, such as jet skis. This file was created through participatory mapping. Representatives from the boating, diving, and fishing industries all met together and through a series of map exercises, mapped out the extents and routes of watercraft use. The file shows the geographic distribution of these activities and includes the following attributes: name and type.

USVI Personal Watercraft Nonmotorized

This file represents the areas where non-motorized activities are prevalent on the island of St. Thomas and within the East End Marine Park in St. Croix, and includes kite boarding, windsurfing, paddle boarding, Hobie Cat sailing areas, and kayaking. This file was created through participatory mapping. Representatives from the boating, diving, and fishing industries all met together and through a series of map exercises, mapped out the extent of these areas. The file shows the geographic distribution of these activities and includes the following attributes: area name and activity type.

USVI STXEEMP Beach/Camp Area

This file represents the popular beaches and campsites within East End Marine Park of St. Croix. The file shows the geographic distribution of these activities.

USVI STXEEMP Fishing/Conch Area

This file represents the large fish and conch fishing grounds within the East End Marine Park of St. Croix. The file shows the geographic distribution of these activities.

USVI STXEEMP Surfing

This file represents the frequent surfing areas within the East End Marine Park of St. Croix. The file shows the geographic distribution of these activities.

USVI Snorkeling/Swimming

This file represents the frequent snorkeling areas around St. Thomas, St. John and within East End Marine Park of St. Croix. This file was created through participatory mapping. Representatives from the boating, diving, and fishing industries all met together and through a series of map exercises, mapped out the extents of these areas. The file shows the geographic distribution of these activities and includes the following attributes: name and use.